B2B Website Teardown by ProtoFuse – Ep. #2

B2B Website Teardown by ProtoFuse – Ep. #2


Hey, everybody! Welcome to episode number two of the B2B Website Teardown series. In this particular episode, we are gonna be looking at
Suncoast Partners International. Now the founder and
the CEO of this company is Dan Nelson. He’s a good friend of ours. We’ve worked with him with another client. He’s actually been on our podcast before, so we have a really good
relationship with him. He offered up his website
so we are gonna tackle that. If you haven’t seen episode number one, I definitely recommend giving that a listen and a watch. We talk about Sweet Fish Media. I also give a little
bit of an introduction to this whole series
and what it’s all about. Okay, so in this episode
we are gonna be looking at Dan’s website which is found at suncoast-partners.com. What he offers is consulting
in the sales space so his company, his clients are B2B tech. This is his website
that you see right here and there are three things that I’m gonna pinpoint today. The first is gonna be content. The second piece is going to be the visual design aspect of it, and more particular, the
images that he’s using. And the third piece is
his conversion strategy, like what is his major call to action and how he’s executing that on his site. Okay? So those are the three pieces. So let’s get into the first piece, which is content. If you look around Dan’s website, it’s pretty light. Home, about SPI, he’s got
a services section here and a contact. It’s just missing a lot
of thought leadership. When you’re in B2B, especially when you’re targeting
B2B technology companies that are going to really probably vet their vendors and spend a lot of time discussing them and figuring out if they’re a good fit, they’re gonna want to see quality content you express really great expertise around. And I’m not seeing that
with Dan’s website. Really he’s kinda taken a 95/5 approach, so what I mean by that
is 95% of his content is all about him and his services, and 5% is maybe helpful to his prospects. What I would recommend is
taking an 80/20 approach. Now I found this idea
through Valuable Content. You see here Sonja Jefferson wrote it many years ago, back in 2013, but when I first read
it, I subscribed to it very quickly and it’s just a real, digestible way to think
about your content. And really the gist of it is, is 80% of your content needs to be helpful and educational to your audience, and 20% should be all about you. Most B2B websites have
got that flipped around where 20% of their content is helpful educational content, that’s gonna be thought leadership,
that’s gonna help people with the decision process,
with the research process, and 80% is all about them. So this is what I would recommend to Dan and we’ve actually
talked about this before, is take an 80/20 approach. Again, he’s like at 95, 5%. He needs to start
creating valuable content on a regular basis that shows that he’s an expert in this sales space, so that prospects come here and say, yes, these are the problems that we’re having. Dan understands me really, really well. Let me reach out, start a
conversation with him, okay? So that’s the first piece. The second piece is just
the use of photography. If you look at the home page here, you’re gonna see a common theme of really generic stock photography and the people, most of the images that he’s using here in
this automated slideshow is they’re looking right at the camera, like this guy right here. Nothing screams generic about a website than the use of generic stock photography. Now I’ve explored this whole idea here, 5 Lazy Design Decisions That Will Make Your Website Generic. This is a blog post that I
wrote a couple years ago. And I’ve thought long and hard about this and one of those things that I mentioned in this blog post is stock photography everywhere. I swear, if I see another photo of a CSR on a website’s contact page, I may just lose it. (laughs softly) So in this blog post I mentioned a SlideShare that I found years ago, not even sure who the author was on this, but it’s really, really good. It’s 47 slides and the title of it is, 7 types of stock images that
you must stop using today. I love it. I’ll link to it. It’s a really good resource, but back to Dan’s website. He’s using a lot of
generic stock photography and it just screams, this is a generic, and potentially people could think that it’s a generic business and it’s the same old sales consulting that everyone else provides, and I know that’s not
true because I know Dan, and I know he’s a solid
guy and he knows his stuff and he brings a lot of value to the table. So really be careful with image selection. The third piece is conversion and of course, with a B2B website you’re trying to inspire
people to take action, right? So if you look kinda around his website, I don’t see any major call to action that’s really differentiated
from the body, that I can easily identify. A good tactic that I learned is the squint test, so
if look at your website and you squint, and you should be able to make out where the call to action is on your site, ’cause
it’s got the white space, it’s got the proximity, it’s big enough, it’s clear enough. I see here in the body of his page he’s got these three buttons, about SPI, schedule a confidential consultation, join our mailing list. I wanna see this schedule
a confidential consultation here in the top of his site somewhere, or doesn’t even have to be in the top. It needs to be clear. He’s got this contact SPI section. Always avoid a generic contact section. Try to be a little bit more specific with how someone can reach out to you. Here’s a couple different examples from some of our clients. Cactus Technologies, they decided to frame their CTA around talking to an expert, so talk to a Cactus expert that you see here. So if you kinda squint your eyes, you can definitely see that it passes the squint test. That button is very
obvious when you squint. And the second example is MCT. So these guys are distributors of high-speed video cameras, and their major call to action is request a product demo, right? It’s not contact us. There is a contact page,
but the call to action is request a product demo. And then the third example
is Falcon’s Creative Group. They have schedule a conversation, which is a very approachable way. You click that button,
it takes you to a form, but again, they’re avoiding a generic contact us section. And Dan has this schedule
a confidential consultation but I wanna see this instead of a generic contact section. Still, let people contact you, maybe with a general form if they want to, but don’t make that the focus. There you go. That is your B2B Website Teardown episode number two. Hopefully this has been helpful. Again, if you know anybody that would like a teardown, please introduce me to them. I’d love to provide some value and dig into that and give you some tips. So until next time! Thanks, guys.

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